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What Do You Call a 670 RWHP 2006 Subaru STi Generating Thousands in Downforce: A Winner

As the morning sun rises across the High Desert, the AEM filter is ready for action

As the morning sun rises across the High Desert, the AEM filter is ready for action

In the trunk of their car, the AEM crew carried with them to Willow Springs, California, brand new hats designed specifically to be given only to AEM-sponsored race winners. Little did they know they’d be passing out their first hat at that weekend’s Redline Time Attack event.

The massive front splitter and rear wing can be clearly seen this is side shot

The massive front splitter and rear wing can be clearly seen this is side shot

After a dominating performance in his Modified Class 2006 Subaru STi at the time attack run earlier this year on the full Willow Springs “big track”, Mark Jager returned to the high desert circuit to run the event on the smaller, tighter “Streets of Willow” circuit.

What makes this all so significant to AEM is that it’s the first event that Mark ran a new AEM filter configuration and took both Overall and Modified Class honors at round three of the Redline Time Attack Series. Not only that, but Mark was also carrying the new AEM logo on his car and wearing his new AEM drivers suit at the event for the first time.

If you’re not familiar with Time Attack, fear not. Here are the basics in one easy-to-swallow paragraph: Time Attack features drivers competing for the fastest single lap around a paved road racing course. The cars range from slightly upgraded to heavily modified production sedans and sports cars. Cars are classified on two criteria: its drive wheels (FWD, RWD, or AWD) and the level of modification to the vehicle. As the sport of Time Attack originated in Japan, it is often associated with Japanese cars, however vehicles of any origin can compete.

Massive rear tunnels provide a great deal of downforce as well

Massive rear tunnels provide a great deal of downforce as well

Mark proudly displays his new AEM driver suit and winner’s circle hat as he accepts the awards for both his class win as well as his overall victory.

Mark proudly displays his new AEM driver suit and winner’s circle hat as he accepts the awards for both his class win as well as his overall victory.

A bit about Mark ’s car for the 2016 season: To better balance downforce, the team added an enormous custom front splitter developed internally to counteract the downforce generated by APR Performance GT1000 dual element Swan neck wing.

Chassis set-up was a cooperation between Koherent Chassis Workz, which partnered with Yimi Sport to provide the ability to align and corner balance the car to Mark ’s liking. Taking the nearly completed car to the dyno yielded a disappointing 550 horsepower, due to largely to some debris in the fuel system. All elements were replaced and upgraded and the engine finally generated 670 rear wheel horsepower. A larger ACT clutch grabs onto all that extra power.

Engine work started with Killer B Motorsports and their sleeved EJ motor, opting to have it O-ringed to ensure that the JE Pro Seal gaskets made the best seal possible, given the internal pressures the engine will see. Flat Performance and Renner Race Development built the long block utilizing JE Pistons, GSC Billet Cams and a good deal of “magic dust”.

Some of the other good folks who support Mark in his efforts are Borg Warner, AEM Electronics, Fortune Auto, Wasp Composites, ACT and a list that goes on and on.

And to back up Mark ’s experience with AEM filters on the track, he installed an AEM Cold Air Intake System on his diesel Ram tow rig gaining approximately 11 horsepower. Further, Mark commented that more air means more usable power and acceleration throughout the engine’s RPM range. Not to mention it is CARB legal.


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